What is Core Science Foundation?

In March 2017 the Core Science Foundation was born.

Our intention is to create a strong relationship between Core Energetics en Science. This will create multiple positive effects:

  • Scientific support of Core Energetics techniques gives clarity about the why and when of interventions (professionalization)
  • Scientific support gives a broader embedding of the models and theory in modern insights and practice
  • Diagnosis (hypotheses about a client) and a scientific approach in thinking about a client and his/her process will allow us to build a respected global brand and therapeutic process (professionalization)
  • Scientific support stimulates development of models and theory of Core Energetics; to move into the future, connect with future ways to heal people (“what’s next!”)
  • Connecting Core Energetics to Science connects Core Energetics to “the outside world of therapy”

So it is a splendid way to step forward, to come out of our cocoon of the ’60-’70 years’ body therapy and to connect with the world around us.

Possible Content

There are a lot of areas in science that can have a valuable contribution to our work.

  • Attachment
  • Psychopathology and diagnosis
  • Neurobiology
  • Anxiety
  • Hormonal processes
  • Scientific research on the effects of CE on mental health
  • Positive psychology
  • Which attitude, knowledge, skills make a therapist a good therapist

Potential tasks

The Core Science Foundation can perform different tasks:

  • Provide information about relevant scientific research and about writing articles (like EABP and USABP)
  • Integrate scientific research and insights into the curriculum of NICE
  • Integrate the scientific approach into the curriculum of NICE and in the work with clients
  • Develop and standardize intake and diagnostic approaches, including scientific and evidence-based ways of collecting data
  • Expand the theoretical framework of CE
  • Look for and stimulate scientific research on the effects of CE in treating various types of mental illnesses or various complaints which the client comes to therapy with

Our corevalues

Scientific support of Core Energetics techniques gives clarity about the why and when of interventions

Scientific support gives a broader embedding of the models and theory in modern insights and practice

Diagnosis and a scientific approach in thinking about a client and his/her process will allow us to build a respected global brand and therapeutic process

Scientific support stimulates development of models and theory of Core Energetics; to move into the future, connect with future ways to heal people (“what’s next!”)

Connecting Core Energetics to Science connects Core Energetics to “the outside world of therapy”

How it started

In Brindisi (2016) Gees Boseker presented her research investigating the effects of different types of interventions which addressed specific client complaints.

Since then a lot of people have come forward with their own wish to connect science to the Core Energetics practice. Interestingly, as a background to this, research is slowly starting to emerge which examines the effects of body psychotherapy on a wide range of mental illnesses and complaints, including: Schizophrenia (Priebe et al., 2013, Röhrich et al., 2009, Röhricht, 2010, Röhricht et al., 2011), anxiety disorders (Levy Berg et al., 2009), depression (Röhricht et al., 2013), post-traumatic stress disorder and complex trauma (Van der Kolk, 2014, Van der Kolk, 2002) and sexual abuse (Price, 2006).  Although therapeutic approaches which have an overlap with Core Energetics have been studied quite broadly, like EMDR, Sensorimotor psychotherapy, Gestalt, Hakomi, Bioenergetics, Schema-based therapy, Attachment therapy, and Psychodynamic approaches – little, if any, academic research has been performed using specific Core Energetics principles and its process as a means to investigate therapeutic effectiveness to treat specific complaints. 

These initial thoughts and ideas was the start of a Core Science Foundation.

In a meeting Gees Boseker, Anna Timmermans and Tanja Konig decided that a Foundation with fundraising is the best way to give this form.

We need you!

As a board we want to collect contributions of people; coordinate initiatives; choose what must be done first. But we need you all to let it really happen! If you have ideas, input, information, please mail to gees@coresciencefoundation.comOfcourse we also need money. Donations can be deposit here. Every amount counts. Fundraising will be started too. 

And if you like to read latest insight on this topic

(with thanks to Angel Buster!)

LEVY BERG, A., SANDELL, R. & SANDAHL, C. 2009. Affect-focused body psychotherapy in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: Evaluation of an integrative method. Journal of psychotherapy Integration, 19, 67.

PRICE, C. 2006. Body-oriented therapy in sexual abuse recovery: A pilot-test comparison. Journal of bodywork and movement therapies, 10, 58-64.

PRIEBE, S., SAVILL, M., REININGHAUS, U., WYKES, T., BENTALL, R., LAUBER, C., MCCRONE, P., RÖHRICHT, F. & ELDRIDGE, S. 2013. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of body psychotherapy in the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia – a multi-centre randomised controlled trial. BMC Psychiatry, 13, 26.

RÖHRICH, F., PAPADOPOULOS, N., SUZUKI, I. & PRIEBE, S. 2009. Ego-pathology, body experience, and body psychotherapy in chronic schizophrenia. Psychology & Psychotherapy: Theory, Research & Practice, 82, 19-30.

RÖHRICHT, F. 2010. W03-02 – Body psychotherapy in chronic schizophrenia – randomized controlled trials and a naturalistic study on effectiveness of manualised intervention strategies. European Psychiatry, 25, Supplement 1, 133.

RÖHRICHT, F., PAPADOPOULOS, N., HOLDEN, S., CLARKE, T. & PRIEBE, S. 2011. Therapeutic processes and clinical outcomes of body psychotherapy in chronic schizophrenia – An open clinical trial. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 38, 196-203.

RÖHRICHT, F., PAPADOPOULOS, N. & PRIEBE, S. 2013. An exploratory randomized controlled trial of body psychotherapy for patients with chronic depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 151, 85-91.

VAN DER KOLK, B. 2014. The body keeps the score: Brain, mind, and body in the healing of trauma, Penguin.

VAN DER KOLK, B. A. 2002. The assessment and treatment of complex PTSD. Treating trauma survivors with PTSD, 127-156.

 

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